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About Varied / Hobbyist Official Beta Tester MartinMale/Canada Groups :icontechtreasuers: TechTreasuers
 
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Deviant for 4 Years
3 Month Core Membership
Statistics 954 Deviations 17,100 Comments 34,183 Pageviews

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UPDATES. The Deviant is:

:bulletred: :bulletred: :bulletred: is working hard :bulletred: :bulletred: :bulletred:

:bulletblue:Quote of the week: "The next best thing to being clever is being able to quote someone who is." - Mary Pettibone Poole

Thanks for visiting! If you didn't find what you were looking for, just ask below on the right. Perhaps one of the cats has it.

Tanita the Kentauride

Don't disturb by 914four


:bulletblue: The cover artwork for my book, "The Kentauride," now available on the Amazon Kindle Store www.amazon.com/dp/B00CLDQ92W.
Artwork by Ileana Hunter, cover layout and composition by Guylaine Régimbald:
The Kentauride by IleanaHunter

:bulletblue: This is the original by Ileana Hunter, the artwork she created for the book:
Tanita by IleanaHunter

:bulletblue: A closer look, I love the emotion in her eyes, and these scans really do not do the original justice:
Tanita - detail by IleanaHunter
Ileana has agreed to do the artwork for "The Centaur" as well. Keep an eye out for it in the next couple of months.

Some of my Favorite Quotes

:bulletgreen: "The next best thing to being clever is being able to quote someone who is." - Mary Pettibone Poole

:bulletblack: "Never underestimate the bandwidth of a station wagon full of mag tapes hurtling down the highway." - Andrew S. Tanenbaum

:bulletblack: "Authors from whom others steal should not complain, but rejoice. Where there is no game there are no poachers." - Marie von Ebner-Eschenbach

:bulletblack: "Don’t expect, in fact, to make more than you would have made from flipping burgers part-time for the same number of hours of work for your first novel." - Holly Lisle

:bulletblack: "Every human being is entitled to courtesy and consideration. Constructive criticism is not only to be expected but sought." - Margaret Chase Smith

:bulletblack: “If you can change your mind, you can change your life.” - William James

:bulletblack: "There are two novels that can change a bookish fourteen-year old's life: The Lord of the Rings and Atlas Shrugged. One is a childish fantasy that often engenders a lifelong obsession with its unbelievable heroes, leading to an emotionally stunted, socially crippled adulthood, unable to deal with the real world. The other, of course, involves orcs." - John Rogers

:bulletblack:"Simple can be harder than complex: You have to work hard to get your thinking clean to make it simple. But it's worth it in the end because once you get there, you can move mountains." - Steve Jobs

:bulletblack: "A person is a fool to become a writer. His only compensation is absolute freedom. " - Roald Dahl

:bulletblack:"It's what non-car people don't get. They see all cars as just tonne-and-a-half, two-tonnes of wires, glass, metal and rubber. That's all they see. People like you or I know, we have an unshakable belief that cars are living entities. You can develop a relationship with a car. And that's just what non-car people don't get." -Jeremy Clarkson

:bulletblack:"When you see the tree you're about to hit, it's called understeer. When you can only hear and feel it, it's oversteer." - Walter Rohrl

:bulletblack:"Alas, all too often, Enzos end up illustrating what happens when too much money, too much car, and too little talent arrive at the same place at the same time." - Mike Sheehan

:bulletblack:"If one cannot state a matter clearly enough so that even an intelligent twelve-year-old can understand it, one should remain within the cloistered walls of the university and laboratory until one gets a better grasp of one's subject matter." - Margaret Mead

:bulletblack:"We are stuck with technology when what we really want is just stuff that works." - Douglas Adams

:bulletblack:"There are many intelligent species in the universe. They are all owned by cats." - Anonymous

:bulletblack:"Ford," he said, "you're turning into a penguin. Stop it." - Douglas Adams (from The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy)

:bulletblack:"[He] died of a lethal overdose of brick wall, taken while under the influence of a Ferrari and a bottle of tequila." Douglas Adams (from The Long Dark Tea-Time of the Soul, 1988)

:bulletblack:"Of all God's creatures there is only one that cannot be made the slave of the leash. That one is the cat. If man could be crossed with the cat it would improve man, but it would deteriorate the cat." - Mark Twain Notebook, 1894

:bulletblack:"Porsches are like children, you won't truly understand until you have had one." - Nicole Galarneau

:bulletblack:"There is, incidentally, no way of talking about cats that enables one to come off as a sane person." - Dan Greenberg

:bulletblack:"Committees are, by nature, timid. They are based on the premise of safety in numbers; content to survive inconspicuously, rather than take risks and move independently ahead. Without independence, without the freedom for new ideas to be tried, to fail, and to ultimately succeed, the world will not move ahead, but rather live in fear of it's own potential" - Ferdinand Anton Ernst Porsche

:bulletblack:"Be thankful for problems. If they were less difficult, someone with less ability might have your job." - James A. Lovell

:bulletblack: "Keep away from people who try to belittle your ambitions. Small people always do that, but the really great make you feel that you, too, can become great." - Mark Twain

:bulletblack:"Yes, it was an act of God. But which God?" - Douglas Adams

:bulletblack: "Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness." - Mark Twain

:bulletblack:“The surest way to kill a man is to pay him to do nothing.” - Félix Leclerc

Visitors

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Sep 3, 2015
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Activity


Final tally, 288 copies of "The Kentauride" downloaded for free. Hopefully this will generate a few more reviews!
Currently running a free promotion of "The Kentauride" on Amazon Kindle, over 250 takers as of this morning, better hurry if you want a copy!
And please, an honest review would make my day!
Canadian Pacific Van by 914four
Canadian Pacific Van
The Railway Museum of Eastern Ontario in Smiths Falls, Ontario, had its annual Trainfest event this weekend, and among other activities, my son and I got to ride twice in this ex-CPR van (caboose). The rides only took about 15 minutes, but for the price of entry it was a rather amazing opportunity.
Canadian Pacific painted the ends of their vans red for better visibility (and to better distinguish them from boxcars), then switched to yellow ends in 1967 and painted the sides the same red as previously used on the ends (what was known as the Kodakchrome scheme). By 1968, the introduction of the Multimark (PacMan logo) changed everything, and CPR began painting their vans all yellow with the Multimark, like this one (also at the RMEO and of similar vintage, both are from the Second World War and have plywood siding): CP Rail Caboose by 914four

Interested in spending a night in a real caboose? Check out the RMEO's website: rmeo.org/overnights-on-a-caboo…
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The Bockville Van by 914four
The Bockville Van
This former Canadian Pacific all steel caboose, #437464 was built at CPR’s Angus Shops in Montreal in 1954, and was donated to the City of Brockville in 1987 after it was retired from service. It is 33 feet two inches long, weighs approximately 45,000 lb., runs on Barber 5 x 9 trucks and proudly wears its original 1950ies CPR paint scheme.
See also: The Brockville Van (2) by 914four
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The Brockville Van (2) by 914four
The Brockville Van (2)
This former Canadian Pacific all steel caboose, #437464 was built at CPR’s Angus Shops in Montreal in 1954, and was donated to the City of Brockville in 1987 after it was retired from service. It is 33 feet two inches long, weighs approximately 45,000 lb., runs on Barber 5 x 9 trucks and proudly wears its original 1950ies CPR paint scheme.
See also: The Bockville Van by 914four
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If I offered a copy of "The Centaur" for free, would you write an honest review on Amazon in exchange? Most who have read it found it to be better than "The Kentauride," the first book in the series.
50%
4 deviants said Sure, where do I sign up?
25%
2 deviants said I refuse to answer on the grounds that I may incriminate myself.
13%
1 deviant said Nope, I don't write reviews.
13%
1 deviant said Maybe, but only if it doesn't suck (it won't, I assure you).
0%
No deviants said I have another opinion, which I will share below.
I'll be away until the 10th of August or so.
Pennsylvania T1 by 914four
Pennsylvania T1

Pennsylvania T1 4-4-4-4

This is an image I scanned from a stack of black and white photographs given to me by a man who was trying to date my mother shortly after my father passed away. I can't remember his name (and neither can my mom!), but I'm grateful for the photos. To the best of my knowledge, he did not renew the copyright on them (I can see no reason for him to do so as he told me he no longer had the negatives) and they are all from the 1950ies, so I am assuming that they are now public domain. Just to be safe, however, I am not granting a CC licence as I don't technically own the rights. I may scan a few others and upload them as time permits.

The Pennsy T1 has to be my all-time favourite steam locomotive (I'd love to get one in N scale but they rarely sell for less than US$2k on eBay and that is way beyond my budget). With streamlined styling by Ramond Lowey, the T1 was sleek, elegant, and fast! Unfortunately, the technologically sophisticated engines were difficult to maintain (notice the absence of side-skirts on the example above) and required a smooth hand at the throttle or they would just spin their wheels in place. Designed to run at a 100 MPH (160 km/h) cruising speed, there are claims that they were capable of 150 (240 km/h) if the poppet valves held up! They were so powerful that a sudden throttle increase at 100 MPH would cause wheelspin. The excessive cost of operations (some say that poor training of the engineers was also a major factor) caused their early demise, with the first Baldwin prototype introduced in 1942 and the Pennsy announcing their planned retirement in 1948. By 1956, they had all been scrapped. I believe that this picture is of a scrap line (note the tender just in front) which would place it somewhere between 1952 and 1956.

The T1 Trust (prrt1steamlocomotivetrust.org/) are in the process of building a 1:1 scale model. Here is what they have to say about it:

The Pennsylvania Railroad (PRR) T1 Steam Locomotive Trust is a non-profit organization that believes in thinking differently about preservation. Through hard work, dedicated volunteers and the financial support of many generous donors from around the globe, the T1 Trust is constructing PRR T1 5550. Slated to become the fifty-third locomotive of its class when complete, 5550 combines stunning art deco design with a unique 4-4-4-4 wheel arrangement. The goal is simple; to provide mainline steam excursion service, and to set the World Speed Record for a steam locomotive.

The PRR T1 represents the pinnacle of steam locomotive design in the United States. These locomotives had the capability of achieving speeds in excess of 120 mph, and anecdotal reports indicate that speeds of up to 140 mph were attained. In all, 52 class T1 locomotives were produced, 25 at the PRR's Altoona shops and 27 at the Baldwin Locomotive Works in Philadelphia. Sadly, not a single example of this magnificent machine escaped the scrapper's torch.

The production of PRR T1 5550 will fill a large gap in historical locomotive preservation. Perhaps more importantly, this locomotive will inject new life blood into an aging heritage fleet. Most US built steam locomotives operating today are over 60 years old. Wear and tear are taking their toll. Efforts such as this one, to create a powerful new machine, will become increasingly important if steam excursion service is to be present in another 60 years.

The die has already been cast for this project. In 2008 a group of railway enthusiasts in Great Britain completed LNER Peppercorn Class A1 60163 Tornado, the first mainline steam locomotive built in the United Kingdom since 1960. Posted here is a link to the Tornado video. This video provides inspiration, and describes the framework we'll rely on for the PRR T1 5550 project.

Experience has shown that in a project such as this, a large number of small donations, which recur monthly, can achieve success. If you would like to see this project come to fruition, please consider using the Donate Button below to make a contribution. Some supporters will wish to make a $20 per month recurring pledge. The regular donation was the driving force behind Tornado. For less than one dollar per day, we can all marvel at the sight of 5550, phoenix-like, arising from the molten metal of the foundry to fly at 140 mph, shrouded in Vulcan's billowing cape.

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WC 70 Tonner by 914four
WC 70 Tonner
Speaking of BCRail, here is a picture of Waterloo Central 1556, a GE 70 tonner built in 1950 as Pacific Great Eastern Railway #556 (the PGE became BCR in 1972). It is in regular active service pulling passenger excursions on the Waterloo Spur. Tickets and schedule can be found here: waterloocentralrailway.com/
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Continental drift by 914four
Continental drift
OK, maybe not the right title, but it was all I could come up with; they do move occasionally! I promised someone this pic a while back, but I forgot who. This was taken this summer at an undisclosed location along highway 7. :-)
UPDATE July 10, 2015, dateline the Tim Hortons in Madoc, Ontario: Drove by earlier and the three cars are definitely gone, as is everything except an old MOW-orange van. I thing the owner either moved or moved on, we can only hope that these timeless classics were sent to a good home.
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So I’ve been somewhat out of touch lately, catching up on a few notes here and there and posting stuff that has been in my STASH for way too long, but not as present as I would normally like to be. This is mainly the fallout of a significant project I’ve been working on as part of my day job, the one that pays my bills and allows me to write in my spare time. As a result, I’ve been working long, twelve-hour-plus days and most weekends, including holidays (like Victoria Day and Canada Day) and barely keeping up with my family obligations, much less my dA stuff.
Back in December, my little sister came to live with us with her four children (aged 2 to 8) for six months, and we’ve been trying to get the household back to a semblance of normal since their departure. Having extra people in the house overloaded our water filtration systems, and we have had to replace most of them, as well as the furnace that died in January and the clothes dryer that died in December. Add to this my mother-in-law being hospitalized (she’s fine now, but we were worried for while), more family visiting, and a few other minor disasters that shall remain nameless, and you could quite easily conclude that I have been, as the old Chinese curse goes, living in interesting times. Being one of those writers who will never settle for ten words when one-hundred will suffice, all this was to say that various distractions and calamities have made the odds of “The Dragon” being published in September about on par with Milli Vanilli making a massive comeback and winning their Grammy back. The good news is that my techno-muse*, Dan, is currently in Ottawa for the week, visiting various friends that have made the big move away from Montreal. This weekend, we are going to the-track-formerly-known-as-Mosport for the only Canadian TUDOR championship event, and I am hoping that he will help me sort the wheat** from the chaff and get me back on track. Will it be ready for November? Doubtful. But hey, stranger things have happened, and I usually write 15 to 20 k words during the three day weekend, assuming the beer is cold and they don’t fill the intermissions with too much interesting stuff that begs to be photographed.
Dan’s challenge will be to extract the good ideas from the literally hundreds of short one-to-two paragraph subplots and digressions I’ve managed to accumulate over the past year. Ether there needs to be some serious editing (not that I haven’t used the scythe on the manuscript a few times already) or this may turn out to be a five-book-trilogy (there is precedence for such a thing, but I digress). In any case, your humble servant is still hard at work and is doing what he can to finish the series. I could tell you that someone will die in book three, but that might spoil the suspense and no one would read it, so I won’t.
As to people reading the books, the first two in the series had been doing reasonably OK for quite some time, not stellar, but at least 5-6 books a month (with a couple of peaks) since last year, and suddenly there hasn’t been a sale since early June. If you’ve read one of the books, a review on Amazon, Bookbub, Goodreads or any other site would be most appreciated, as apparently people actually do read them, and it would seem that volume of reviews actually plays some minor part in reader book selection. To make matters worse, “The Centaurhas fallen outside the infamous top one million on Amazon.com, which is a sure sign that no one has bought a copy in at least a month. This is the first time ever that one of my books has had a seven-digit ranking on Amazon, and it’s hit me quite a bit harder than I thought it would. Please excuse me while I collect myself. On that note, isn’t it just amazing where sleep-deprivation will take your thought processes? I think I need an alcoholic beverage…

Moving along to the international front, a recent CBC article bore the wildly sensationalist title, “One-third of American 8th graders think Canada is a dictatorship, report reveals.” I just wanted to reassure all my American friends that we are still actively planning to overthrow Mr. Harper in a National Coup, scheduled for October 19th, 2015, but we want it to be a surprise so please don’t tell him! All the anti-Justin adds are kinda making me want to vote for Trudeau.

Lastly, the reason most of you still come here I suspect, are the cats. Newton has gotten over my two-year-old nephew’s disappearance, but still isn’t quite his old self. In some ways, he’s matured and become a lot more aloof. Nikolai, on the other hand, has become much bolder and more people-friendly, and he’s no longer afraid to jump up on the table and steal an asparagus shoot when no one is looking, despite knowing he’ll get scolded for it. Fewer children in the house have meant fewer pieces of broccoli and such to scavenge off the floor for our vegetarian pussycat, so he has been improvising. On the other hand, he now knows how to ask for the laser pointer. Many cats get frustrated when their humans don’t understand what they’re saying, and simply give up on us, but Neko has made the leap to communicating with humans; perhaps Newton has been training him. As to Pixel, well, he’s still hiding under the bed…

*   Not to be confused with a techno-mage
** Sorry Jessica, I know you’re badly allergic
  • Mood: Shitty
  • Listening to: Speedball Tucker by Jim Croce
  • Reading: Endless proposal drafts
  • Drinking: coffee; lots of it

Journal History

deviantID

914four
Martin
Artist | Hobbyist | Varied
Canada
"I don't have all the answers, but I certainly have a lot of questions." - me

Current Residence: :flagcanada: Canada, eh?
Why am I here? I joined :devart: because it kept coming up in Google searches for the words "Centaur" and "Kentauride." Since I'm currently in the process of writing a trilogy that features a young Kentauride in a modern setting, this seemed to be the place to hang out. :typerhappy:
Fortune by 914four

The first two books in the series are available at Amazon in Kindle form, with printed versions expected late summer 2014 soon.
Book three is scheduled for late 2015.

Tanita and Tanus, both Centaurs, are my OCs, as are Mark, David and Chloe who are all "normal," meaning that they buy shoes one pair at a time...

I'm also an avid transportation fanatic, do motorsports photography :firelite-photo:, ferroequinology photography, some basic photography (animals and landscapes mostly) and some freehand sketching on occasion. All of my submissions have ratings, some are free for you to do as you please with, others I'd rather not be used for commercial purposes because they may have trademarks or such that I cannot grant you rights for:skull:, and lastly some are personal and are shared simply because someone asked:idea:. I would respectfully request that you heed the rating as they are posted for each submission; just because one image is free for you to use doesn't mean that all are. I have several hundred thousand images stored on UDO and DDS media. Unfortunately the database linking to these images was lost due to bit rot (data corruption), so it is not a simple task to find anything; if I have promised to find an image for you, please be patient, as it can be very time consuming and I do have a day job. Lastly, I do not Photoshop any of my images, what you see is what I shot, unless otherwise indicated. Thanks. :-)

I am very open to comments and critiques, and encourage constructive criticism. If you didn't like it, tell me why, and I'll try and do better next time. I make every attempt to be fair and constructive in my comments, I appreciate it when others to do the same. I tend to use a lot of quotes in my posts, I collect quotes and use them liberally.

Also, if I should die, please do not let my wife sell my diecast or model train collections for what she thinks I paid for them.

Operating System: OSX, Solaris 10, Mint Linux
MP3 player of choice: antique iPod, sometimes my MacBook Pro
Shell of choice: Bourne (or BASH)
Wallpaper of choice: It would take too much room to explain... =p
Skin of choice: Pirelli P-Zero... wait, is that skin or skins?
Favourite cartoon character: Rubine, also Taarna (from the original Heavy Metal)
Dumbest thing I can remember doing: Getting completely airborne in an '87 VW Fox
Smartest thing I can remember doing: Convincing my then girlfriend to move in with me
Strangest thing I can remember doing: Reading the entire "Mission Earth" series by L. Ron Hubbard.
Greatest accomplishment: My son
Personal Quote: You should never attempt to teach a pig to sing. It wastes your time and it annoys the pig.
Iconoclasm: I've thought of myself as an iconoclast ever since I first looked up the definition, some time ago. When I say iconoclast, I mean it in the nonconformist way, not one who destroys church property. I've always challenged the status quo, and nothing annoys me more than "That's the way we've always done it," with the possible exception of "That's not my job" and "Do you know who I am?" In my opinion, everyone deserves respect; some may have earned a bit more, but those who demand it deserve it just a bit less.
The boss: Intense by 914four
Interests

Save the BC Wolves!

If I offered a copy of "The Centaur" for free, would you write an honest review on Amazon in exchange? Most who have read it found it to be better than "The Kentauride," the first book in the series. 

50%
4 deviants said Sure, where do I sign up?
25%
2 deviants said I refuse to answer on the grounds that I may incriminate myself.
13%
1 deviant said Nope, I don't write reviews.
13%
1 deviant said Maybe, but only if it doesn't suck (it won't, I assure you).
0%
No deviants said I have another opinion, which I will share below.

Comments


Add a Comment:
 
:iconsharkharrington:
SharkHarrington Featured By Owner 5 days ago   Photographer
Oh good, I'm not too late to wish you a Happy Birthday!  I was a little distracted today; detailed the Boxster and got a haircut . . .  
Have a beer and eat some cake!  Beer Ching Cake 

~Shark 8-)
Reply
:icon914four:
914four Featured By Owner 2 days ago  Hobbyist General Artist
Strangely enough, I did :-) My buddy Dan came down from Montreal and his presence seems to dramatically increase my beer intake.
Reply
:iconbrooklyn47:
Brooklyn47 Featured By Owner 5 days ago  Hobbyist Photographer
Happy Birthday! :D :D :D
Reply
:icon914four:
914four Featured By Owner 2 days ago  Hobbyist General Artist
Thank you!
Reply
:iconthedirestraits:
thedirestraits Featured By Owner 5 days ago  Hobbyist Photographer
Happy darn birthday,dude! Is there a quote for that? Enjoy yourself!
Reply
:icon914four:
914four Featured By Owner 1 day ago  Hobbyist General Artist
How about: "When I became a man I put away childish things, including the fear of childishness and the desire to be very grown up." - CS Lewis
:-) Thank you!
Reply
:iconthedirestraits:
thedirestraits Featured By Owner 1 day ago  Hobbyist Photographer
Good!You're very welcome!
Reply
:iconrobsrice:
RobSRice Featured By Owner 5 days ago  Professional Writer
I wish you the happiest of birthdays, the healthiest of children, the heartiest of marriages, and satisfying sales and good notices for your works of prose.
Reply
:icon914four:
914four Featured By Owner 1 day ago  Hobbyist General Artist
Thank you Rob, I am grateful for your kind wishes.
Reply
:iconmensjedezeemeermin:
MensjeDeZeemeermin Featured By Owner 5 days ago
To know you is an education, to share your world is an adventure, to see your creations is a priceless gift, to appreciate your
erudition is humbling.  To interact with you is a pleasure, and so we seek you out and rejoice in your existence, wishing you to
rejoice in it also, and, moreover, to celebrate your being and to thank your parents.  We thank THEM for the wonderful gift
they gave US on a day we so justly celebrate by wishing you a very, very HAPPY BIRTHDAY!
Reply
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